Broccoli + Roasted tomato quiche

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Pie crust:
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
8 tbs butter, chilled and cut into small dice
2 tablespoons ice water

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Filling:
3 eggs
1/3 cup egg whites
1/3 cup almond milk
1/3 cup cottage cheese
5-6 broccoli florets
1/3 cup roasted tomatoes
Dash salt and pepper
Pinch of grated nutmeg

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Making the pie crust (without food processor):
Mix the flour and salt into a bowl. Add butter into the flour mixture. Using your fingers, break up the butter into pieces that resemble coarse crumbs. Make sure this process doesn’t take too long as your fingers will begin warming the butter. Add the ice water gradually until the dough comes together into a ball.
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Make the Quiche:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Roll the pastry out to fit a 9 inche pie pan. Line the tart pan with the pastry.
In a medium bowl, using a large fork, beat the filling mixture until well blended. Pour the mixture into the uncooked tart shell. Pop the tart pan onto the hot baking tray and bake for about 25 minutes or until the pastry is golden and the filling is set.

Cool for about 10 minutes before serving.

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Protein pancake

This was my first attempt making a protein pancake. It’s actually quite simple!

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1/2 cup rolled oats
1/3 cup cottage cheese
1 banana
1 tbs protein powder (I used Vega chocolate)
1/4 tsp baking powder
1/3 cup water

Blend ingredients together and slowly add more water if needed. The batter should be pourable but not runny.

Cook on medium – medium low heat. Top with any fruits you like. I topped mine with more bananas and a mixture of Greek yogurt, almond butter and cocoa powder. Yum!

Food Fact Friday: Eggs

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Are eggs bad for you? High in cholesterol and fat? The truth is, the yolks are the real powerhouse of nutrients in an egg. Its nutrients range from vitamins A, D, E, several B vitamins and choline to minerals such as calcium, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc and selenium. Additionally, egg yolks are high in protein and carbohydrates, making them an ideal food for energy needs.

However, the good does come with some bad. The yolk contains more than half of the entire egg’s calories as well as all the fats and cholesterol.

I wouldn’t suggest consuming more than 2 eggs a day and although we see more recipes calling for just egg whites, I don’t recommend throwing out the yolk to reduce your calorie intake either! Egg yolks are not bad just like how chocolate is not bad for your health however, everything in moderation won’t hurt your diet.

If you’re really looking to cut the fat and cholesterol but still want a good source of protein, I suggest purchasing carton egg whites. Make sure the ingredient label reads 100% egg whites. They’re versatile and ready to use.